Being polished is good. Being slick is slimy. At least the way the words are used in the English language. But why? What are the nuances that would tell you if someone was slick or polished?

This topic came from a Patrick McGowan post on LinkedIn about putting your best self forward in the video first world. Sara Oblak Speicher, MBA and Bill Hyche joined the conversation.

Patrick shared some of his Grandmother's wisdom: "You always dress for the dignity of the occasion." 

Sara pointed out that the Quick Hits about making a bad first impression (https://youtu.be/CwTbzQgbBbM ) is also relevant.

How are slick and polished different in your mind?

To connect with the panelists, please visit their LinkedIn profiles:
Sara Oblak Speicher, MBA: https://www.linkedin.com/in/saraospeicher/
Patrick McGowan: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mcgowanpatrick/ 
Bill Hyche: https://www.linkedin.com/in/billhyche/ 
Dr Robyn Odegaard: https://www.linkedin.com/in/robynodegaard/

#QuickHits are designed to exercise your brain by letting you listen in on an unscripted conversation to get other people's thoughts on various subjects. If you would like to join a conversation or have a topic you would like to hear discussed, please message me. https://www.DrRobynOdegaard.com 

#slick #polished

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